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Titles

The maximum length of an article title in Blood is 120 characters, including spaces. The title may have one subtitle (which counts toward the 120-character limit), separated from the main title by a colon. Avoid using more than one subtitle.

For Inside Blood Commentaries, the title must be at most 60 characters long, including spaces.

It is preferable that the title be a phrase, but if necessary, it may be a declarative sentence or question.

If a drug name is mentioned in the title, the generic name should be used unless several proprietary versions of the drug are being compared or the article is commenting on a specific proprietary version of the drug.

imatinib (not Gleevec)
alemtuzumab (not Campath)

Abbreviations are generally allowed in titles. If an abbreviation is used in a title, it must be expanded (spelled out) in the abstract.

A study group name may appear in the title and/or the byline; see Bylines for rules for including it in the byline. An abbreviation of the group name may be used alone in the title if it is expanded in the abstract.

If a study group is part of the title, the group's full membership should be listed in an appendix; include a title page note that refers to that appendix.

A complete list of the members of the German Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Study Group appears in the "Appendix."

If a study group is not part of the title or byline but is involved in the article, any membership list should be listed in an appendix, but put the statement referring to the group in "Acknowledgments" rather than in a title page note.

Bylines

Each author name should consist of a full given name and last name; initials and patronymics may be included. Separate names with commas. Use and before the last author's name.

Each author name should be followed by at least 1 superscript number keyed to that author’s affiliation(s); see Affiliation lines.

Stuart T. Fraser Jr,1 Joan Isern,2 and Margaret H. Baron3

If an author has more than 2 affiliations, use a hyphen.

Stuart T. Fraser Jr,1 Joan Isern,2 and Margaret H. Baron3–5

Bylines should not include titles or academic degrees. Symbols, other than the ones that match authors to affiliations, may be used only if they are keyed to title page footnotes indicating equal contributions by specific authors.

Examples of study groups as authors are shown below.

Dieter Huhn, Christoph von Schilling, Martin Wilhelm, Anthony D. Ho, Michael Hallek, Rolf Kuse, Wolfgang Knauf, Ute Riedel, Axel Hinke, Stefanie Srock, Stefan Serke, Christian Peschel, and Bertold Emmerich, for the German Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Study Group
Dieter Huhn, Christoph von Schilling, Martin Wilhelm, Anthony D. Ho, Michael Hallek, Rolf Kuse, Wolfgang Knauf, Ute Riedel, Axel Hinke, Stefanie Srock, Stefan Serke, Christian Peschel, Bertold Emmerich, and the German Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Study Group

In rare circumstances, a study group may be listed as the only author.

An abbreviation of a study group name may be used alone in the byline if it is expanded in the abstract.

If a study group is part of the byline, the group’s full membership should be listed in an appendix; include a title page note that refers to that appendix.

A complete list of the members of the German Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Study Group appears in the “Appendix.”

If a study group is not part of the title or byline but is involved in the article, any membership list should be listed in an appendix but put a statement in “Acknowledgments” rather than in a title page note.

 

Affiliation lines

The affiliation line should be placed below the byline, and each affiliation should be preceded by a superscript number (no space) that is keyed to an author on the byline. Affiliations should be in the order of byline names’ number keys. It may be necessary to treat different departments at the same institution as separate affiliations.

1Department of Oncological Sciences, University of Turin Medical School, Turin, Italy; 2Laboratory Division of Clinical Oncology, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Turin, Italy; and 3Laboratory of Gene Therapy, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Turin, Italy

Do not abbreviate anything in the affiliation lines except for names of US and Australian states and Canadian provinces; use official postal versions of these abbreviations.

If an author’s affiliation has changed since the work reported in the article was done, a current-affiliation statement may be added to the Authorship section.

Abstracts

All articles except Editorials, Blood Forums, Blood Consults, and Letters to Blood must have an abstract.

The abstract must be a single paragraph. The maximum length of an an abstract is 250 words for Regular Articles, e-Blood articles, Review Articles, and Perspectives; 200 words for Brief Reports and How I Treat articles; and 80 words for Blood Spotlights and Evidence-Based Focused Reviews.

Use of abbreviations in abstracts is allowed; see Abbreviations for details.

Parts of an article (eg, references, tables, figures, appendixes) should not be cited in the abstract.

The guidelines for drug names in Titles apply to abstracts too.

Avoid the use of manufacturer names in the abstract unless a specific brand of equipment is being investigated.

Any clinical trial registry information should be given as the last sentence of the abstract.

...We conclude that specific anti–B-cell therapy with rituximab may be beneficial for patients with steroid-refractory chronic GVHD. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00136396.

Title page notes

The following kinds of footnotes are allowed on the title page, in order: statement of equal author contributions, statement of article series, and statement of prior presentation. Other footnotes, such as copyright statements and submitted-accepted-prepublished date notes, will be added by the printer.

Statement of equal author contribution

The following is an example of a statement of equal author contributions.

H.K.K. and M.D.L.L.S. contributed equally to this study.

Statement of article series

If the article is part of a series of articles, a note to that effect may be included and should cite all the previous articles.

This article is a continuation of a previous report.15

Statement of prior presentation

Begin this note with “Presented ...,” if at all possible.

Presented in abstract form at the 57th annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology, Orlando, FL, December 7, 2015.15