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Text headings

All headings should be capitalized sentence style, except that scientific terms should be capitalized or lowercased for accuracy.

Main (first-level) headings

All Regular Articles and e-Blood articles should have an introduction, a methods section, a results section, and a discussion section; they may also have acknowledgments and/or an appendix.

  • Introduction
  • Materials and methods
    (or Patients and methods or Patients, materials, and methods, if appropriate)
  • Results
  • Discussion

Brief Reports should have abbreviated sections:

  • Introduction
  • Study design
  • Results and discussion

Authors revising their papers to be Brief Reports should be sure to combine their results and discussion sections.

All other items with special section designations may use whatever main headings the authors and editors deem appropriate. Inside Blood Commentaries and Letters to Blood should avoid the use of text headings.

Subheadings

Main sections may be subdivided, and the resulting subheadings are not predefined.

Headings should be constructed in parallel; there should never be one subheading in a given section. If you use subheadings, be sure to use a consistent style for each subheading level.

See Abbreviations for information on the use of abbreviations in headings.

Parts of an article (eg, references, tables, figures, appendixes) should not be cited in a heading.

Notes added in proof

Any information added (or deleted) after acceptance is subject to approval by the accepting editor.

Information added between acceptance and page proof composition will be added into the manuscript's existing text by the Blood Production Office.

Information added in page proofs may be added either to existing text or as a note added in proof. Any note added in proof will appear as the last paragraph of "Discussion."

Acknowledgments

This optional section should appear right after "Discussion." List all organizational support, including fellowships, chairs, and grants, in this section. Also include all recognition of nonauthor individual contributions. Begin grant support statements “This work was supported ... .” Designation of which author received which support may be indicated by inserting parenthetical sets of initials.

This work was supported by grants from the Swiss National Science Foundation (81BS-52825) (B.U.M.) and the National Institutes of Health (grants CA41456 and CA72009) (D.G.T.).

Names of acknowledged persons should be presented consistently within each article. Their professional affiliations are optional. Do not include salutations (Dr., Prof., Ms., Mr., etc.). Dedications are not allowed.

If applicable, acknowledgments should include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. Any statement regarding degree candidacy and the relationship of the work to the degree.
A.B.C. and D.E.F. are PhD candidates at Any University. This work is submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the PhD.
  1. Any statement summarizing the role or views of sponsors, government, or employers.
The sponsors of this study are public or nonprofit organizations that support science in general. They had no role in gathering, analyzing, or interpreting the data.

The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views or polices of the Department of Health and Human Services, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the US government.
  1. Any statement of manuscript number for a particular institution.
This is article no. 0000-MEM from the Scripps Research Institute.
  1. Any declaration of no financial interest.
The International Safety Monitoring Committee that commissioned this study is an independent body of scientists including Elias Schwartz (chair, US), Samuel Charache (US), Chaim Hershko (Israel), Stuart MacLeod (Canada), and Giuseppe Masera (Italy). This committee was convened by Apotex Inc in accordance with section 5.5.2 of the International Conference on Harmonization Good Clinical Practice guidelines. The members of the Safety Monitoring Committee and the authors have no financial interest in the development of deferiprone.
  1. Any reference to an appendix listing the membership of a study group (see Titles and Bylines for exceptions).
Thanks to the German Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Study Group for its participation in this study; a complete membership list appears in "Appendix."

Authorship

This required section should appear after the article text and after any acknowledgments. It must contain an authorship statement, a conflict-of-interest statement (positive or negative), and contact information for the corresponding author, and it may contain other information.

The authorship contribution statement should be the first paragraph, introduced by “Contribution:”. The positive or negative conflict-of-interest statement should be the second paragraph, introduced by “Conflict-of-interest disclosure:”. The corresponding author’s contact information should constitute the final paragraph, introduced by “Correspondence:”.

Contribution: H.K.K., M.D.L.L.S., and A.V.G. performed experiments; C.K.K. analyzed results and made the figures; G.T. and H.K.K. designed the research and wrote the paper.
Conflict-of-interest disclosure: The authors declare no competing financial interests.
Correspondence: Giovanna Tosato, Basic Research Laboratory, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892; e-mail: tosatog@mail.nih.gov.

More information about conflict-of-interest disclosures is in the Author Guide.

The corresponding author’s contact information should consist of the name, mailing address, and e-mail address of the author prepared to handle all official correspondence. Avoid academic degrees and phone and fax numbers. If necessary, more than one author’s contact information may be listed.

Correspondence: Pier Giuseppe Pelicci, Department of Experimental Oncology, European Institute of Oncology, Via Ripamonti 435, 20141 Milan, Italy; e-mail: pgpelicci@ieo.it; and Saverio Minucci, Department of Experimental Oncology, European Institute of Oncology, Via Ripamonti 435, 20141 Milan, Italy; e-mail: sminucci@ieo.it.

Other information that may be put in “Authorship” includes any statement of author death, any current author affiliations that have changed since the study was done, and any notice of a study group membership list as an online supplement. All this information should be placed together in the next-to-last paragraph (ie, between the disclosure and the author contact information).

Contribution: H.K.K., M.D.L.L.S., and A.V.G. performed experiments; C.K.K. analyzed results and made the figures; G.T. and H.K.K. designed the research and wrote the paper.
Conflict-of-interest disclosure: The authors declare no competing financial interests.
The current affiliation for R.F. is Division of Haematology/Oncology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
John M. Jones died on 2 August 2016.
A complete list of the members of the German Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Study Group appears as a data supplement to the online version of this article.
Correspondence: Giovanna Tosato, Basic Research Laboratory, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892; e-mail: tosatog@mail.nih.gov.

In notes that mention authors (other than the death statement and the correspondence information), refer to authors with complete sets of initials, with periods and closed up. If 2 or more authors have the same initials, write out last names.

H.D.K.
J.-M.F.
J. M. Faint and J. M. Fletcher

Appendixes

All appendixes appear immediately before "References."

If an appendix contains a figure or table that is referenced anywhere in text, give it a number in succession with any other figures or tables in the article. If the figure or table is not referenced by name anywhere in the text, it need not have a number. If an appendix consists largely of a figure or table, it should not have a number or a caption at all; however, it may have a title and/or legend.

List study group members in an appendix. See Titles, Bylines, and Acknowledgments for instructions on how to refer to such an appendix.

Only if an article has more than 1 appendix should an appendix be numbered; multiple appendixes should be numbered with arabic numerals. If a substantive name for an appendix would be helpful, include it after a colon.

Appendix
Appendix: study group members
Appendix 1, Appendix 2
Appendix 1: study group members

Addenda

The journal does not publish addenda; other options are notes added in proof or appendixes, if appropriate.

Text references to article elements

When referring to other parts of an article, be as specific as possible; avoid general statements such as "see above," "see below," or "see text."

To refer to an article element that does not have a heading, use a lowercase general description of the item, without quotation marks or other punctuation or formatting.

the abstract
the title

To refer to an element of an article that has a printed, unnumbered heading, use quotation marks around the heading exactly as it appears. Do not precede the heading with "the," and do not follow it with "section."

"Introduction"
"Materials and methods" (not "the Materials and methods section")
"Chemotaxis assay"
"Results"
"CCL19-induced dendritic extension of SPDCs"
"References"
"Appendix"

But refer to a numbered element of an article without using quotation marks.

Figure 1
Table 3
Appendix 2

Figure and table callouts

Figures and tables should appear in the order in which they are introduced in the main text. (The main text mention of a figure or table after which the item appears is called its callout.) If necessary, however, figures and tables may be mentioned in a preliminary fashion out of order, as long as this is done prior to "Results," but in such situations the actual figure or table will not appear in the article until its official callout, in order.

Parenthetical mentions of a figure or table should not include "see" unless necessary.

(Figure 1)
(see Figure 1 for a description of the process)

When more than 1 of the same type of element is cited, separate consecutive items with a hyphen and nonconsecutive items with "and."

Figures 1–3
Tables 1 and 3
Figures 2–4 and 6
Tables 2, 4, and 6

Also do this when multiple elements not of the same type are cited in running text.

Tables 2 and 3 and Figures 1 and 4–6 summarize ...

But when multiple elements not of the same type are cited in parentheses, separate them with a semicolon.

(Table 2; Figure 1)
(Figures 1–3; Tables 2 and 4)

Text references to figures may refer directly to panels and subpanels by appending them to the figure name. Separate consecutive panel labels with hyphens and nonconsecutive panel labels with commas followed by no space.

Figure 1A
Figure 2B–C
Figure 3B,D
Figure 4Aiii
Figure 5Ci–iii
Figure 6Bi,iii

Refer to parts of a figure that do not have panel labels or to parts of a table in general terms; avoid punctuation or possessives if at all possible.

Figure 2B inset
Figure 3 filled squares
Table 1 footnotes
the rightmost column of Table 2
"Congenital anomalies" in Table 2

Data presented in a table or figure should not be entirely repeated in the text. When the text does repeat a piece of information from a table or figure, care should be taken to cross-check accuracy.

Text references to companion articles

Companion articles (closely related articles that appear side-by-side in the same issue) are designated as such by the journal editors upon acceptance, if not before. Authors who want their article to be a companion to another should contact the journal editors during the review process or upon acceptance.

If an article references a designated companion article, use the standard citation-reference combination.

(see accompanying article by DiMartino et al,29 )

Lists

Structure

A list of 3 or more items may be presented in the text or as a table. Lists of 2 items should always be presented in the text.

If a list consists of words or phrases and is in the main text, it should be presented as run-in text punctuated by commas or semicolons.

The response of Fanca bone marrow to in vitro stimulation is characterized by (1) an accelerated depletion in CFU-GM progenitors, (2) an evident granulocyte/macrophage differentiation disbalance, and (3) a marked susceptibility of the expanded population to enter into apoptosis.

If a list consists of complete sentences and is in the main text, it should be presented as run-in text or as a set of paragraphs, but always punctuated by periods.

(1) IVIG (black IgGs) and 7E3 (white IgGs) are taken into the cell by pinocytosis. (2) At physiologic pH, IgG has low affinity for the FcRn receptor. (3) Bound IgG molecules are protected from release into the lysosome.

Enumeration

A list need not be numbered, but numbering is encouraged to promote clarity. Number items in a table list or a list of paragraphs using arabic numerals (1, 2, 3, etc), followed by a period, a space, and the list item.

  1. IVIG (black IgGs) and 7E3 (white IgGs) are taken into the cell by pinocytosis.
  2. At physiologic pH, IgG has low affinity for the FcRn receptor.
  3. Bound IgG molecules are protected from release into the lysosome.

In a list that is run in as part of a sentence, number items using arabic numerals (preferred) or lowercase letters surrounded by parentheses and followed by a space and the list item.

Equations

Equations should be run in to paragraphed text if at all possible. In these cases, appropriate grouping symbols should be used to clarify the order of operations.

Vx(smooth) = (Vx-1 + Vx + Vx+1)/3
% specific lysis = 100 x (experimental release - spontaneous release)|/|(maximum release - spontaneous release)
D = (Π - θ)/[√Variance(Π - θ)]

Type equations in display format (ie, on a separate line) only if necessary for clarity.

Supplemental data

Supplemental data (not part of the main manuscript) may be accepted by the editors for publication in the online journal. Examples include videos and spreadsheets. Supplemental data should be cited at least once in the main text.