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Revised Manuscripts

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Following initial peer review, articles judged worthy of further consideration often require revisions, including additional experimentation. However, articles requiring extensive revisions will be at a disadvantage. Revised manuscripts should be received within 3 months of the date on the initial decision e-mail or they will be considered as a new submission, with a separate manuscript number and submission fee. An extension beyond this 3-month period may be granted in order to complete time-consuming new experiments requested by the reviewers, but such extensions must be requested from the Associate Editor at least 2 weeks before the end of the 3-month revision deadline.

If there are any changes to the manuscript’s authorship after the original submission (such as the addition or deletion of an author or a change in the order of authorship), the Change of Authorship form must be signed by all authors and faxed to the Editorial office to 202-776-0549.

Make sure all revisions are marked in the text document by using tools such as underlining, highlighting, and strikethrough. Revisions marked using Microsoft Word Track Changes will not appear in the converted PDF and will be returned to the corresponding author. Checklist for Revised Manuscripts for more information.

Visual Abstract

A Visual Abstract is a single concise, illustrative summary of the main findings of the article. This could be either the concluding figure from the article or, preferably, a figure that is specially designed for the purpose, which captures the content of the article for readers at a single glance. Blood will provide professional illustrator services, if requested by the author or Editors, for Visual Abstracts of accepted manuscripts.

Visual Abstracts are only required for original research articles (Regular Articles, Brief Reports, and e-Blood) that are undergoing a Minor Revision. They should be uploaded as a separate supplemental file.

Visual Abstracts will be displayed in the online table of contents and the online article, but will not appear in the article PDF file or in the print edition. Please see more detailed instructions for creating your Visual Abstracts below.

Guidelines for Visual Abstracts

What is a visual abstract?

A visual abstract is an illustration that concisely depicts the key findings of a scientific paper. It is intended to attract the attention of readers and make it easier for them to find articles that are of interest to them.

Where will my visual abstract be published?

The visual abstract will appear in the final online article. A reduced-size “thumbnail” image of the visual abstract will be part of the article’s entry in the online table of contents. The visual abstract will not be included in the print version of the journal.

Which articles in Blood will feature visual abstracts?

Visual abstracts will only be featured for Regular Articles, Brief Reports, and e-Blood.

What are the technical specifications for a visual abstract?

The full-size visual abstract should be submitted as a single high-resolution (300-dpi or greater) TIFF image in RGB color. It must be 440 pixels wide by 350 to 365 pixels high. Lettering must be large enough to be legible.

Are there other guidelines for preparing a visual abstract?

A visual abstract should be clear, concise, eye-catching, and comprehensible to a typical Blood reader. It should present the most important finding(s) of your study. Keep the use of text to a minimum, and avoid presenting data in tabular form. If the image depicts a biological or biochemical process, it should clearly flow from left to right or top to bottom. Avoid excessive detail or clutter.

Visual abstracts must be original; material reproduced from other sources may not be used. Do not include trade names, logos, or images of trademarked items in your visual abstract.

Can I get help with preparation of my visual abstract?

On request, Blood will arrange for a professional scientific illustrator to polish or redraw your visual abstract. You will be able to review a proof of the redrawn image. There is no charge to authors for this service.

Can I use a figure from my article as a visual abstract?

We strongly recommend that the visual abstract be a separate illustration, not a figure from your article. However, on occasion it may be acceptable to use a figure from an article as a visual abstract.