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Article Types

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Regular Articles

Maximum length for a Regular Article is 4,000 words of text - counting only the Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion. Submissions are limited to a total of 7 figures, and digital images are required. We recommend a limit of 100 references. The sections of a Regular Article should be ordered as follows:

  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Methods
    (must include sufficient information to allow readers to understand the article content)
  • Results
  • Discussion
  • Acknowledgements
  • Authorship Contributions
  • Disclosure of Conflicts of Interest
  • References
  • Tables
  • Figure Legends
  • Figures

Supplemental data - to be published online only - may include additional information regarding methodology, supplemental figures or tables, or primary data sets; it must be submitted with the original manuscript submission so it can be peer reviewed. (See "Supplemental data")

Any involvement of medical writers/researchers, particularly those employed or supported by the pharmaceutical industry, in the writing of an article must be clearly defined and disclosed in the Authorship and/or the Acknowledgements section(s) as appropriate. This type of involvement must also be disclosed to the Editor-in-Chief in the Cover Letter. For more information, see the journal Conflict of interest disclosure and the editorial policies for authors.

Definitive original research articles of exceptional scientific importance may be considered for designation as Plenary Papers. The decision to highlight an article as a Plenary Paper rests entirely with the Editors.

 

Brief Reports

Short manuscripts definitively documenting either experimental results or informative clinical observations will be considered for publication in this category. Single-case reports or case series cannot be accommodated unless they elucidate very novel and important disease biology or approaches to therapy. Brief Reports are not intended to allow publication of incomplete or preliminary findings. The review process is equally rigorous as for Regular Articles and the acceptance rate is lower. Brief Reports may not exceed 1,200 words of text -counting only the Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion. Abstracts must not exceed 200 words and should be a single paragraph with no subheadings. Only 2 figures/tables and 25 references may be included. The sections of a Brief Report should be ordered as follows:

  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Methods
    (must include sufficient information to allow readers to allow reproduction of the data)
  • A combined Results and Discussion section
  • Acknowledgements
  • Authorship Contributions
  • Disclosure of Conflicts of Interest
  • References
  • Tables
  • Figure Legends
  • Figures

 

e-Blood

e-Blood represents two types of articles not previously included for publication as regular articles in Blood. The first category of e-Blood articles includes very well designed systems biology studies (e.g., genomics, proteomics, etc.) These may offer a novel data set of substantial value to the Blood readership. The second category includes reports of novel methodologies of clear relevance and importance for hematology research. Manuscripts in both categories will be evaluated in part by their ability to significantly advance the field, and both should include some data or biological experiments that demonstrate their suitability and validate at least a subset of the dataset or confirm the usefulness of the methodology. It should be noted that a citation for an e-Blood manuscript is equal to a regular manuscript in terms of the impact factor and other standard measures of journal value.

If deemed potentially appropriate for publication by Blood Editors. e-Blood articles undergo standard rigorous peer review identical to regular manuscripts. Accepted e-Blood articles are published in First Edition and then copyedited and composed identically to other Blood papers; while e-Blood articles only appear online, and not in the print version of the Journal, they are listed in the printed Table of Contents when the final version is available online. Manuscripts may be submitted by authors directly for consideration as e-Blood articles or may be recommended by editors for publication as an e-Blood article after being considered first as a Regular Article.

The maximum length for an e-Blood article is 4,000 words of text, counting only the Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion. Digital images are mandatory. Methods sections are allowed to exceed the usual length at the discretion of the Editor. Primary data must be deposited in a public repository as described below. The sections of an e-Blood article should be ordered as follows:

  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Materials and Methods
  • Results
  • Discussion
  • Acknowledgements
  • Authorship Contributions
  • Disclosure of Conflicts of Interest
  • References
  • Tables
  • Figure Legends
  • Figures

Other article types

Review Articles

Review articles are welcomed by the Journal and are generally solicited by the Editor-in-Chief; authors wishing to submit an unsolicited Review Article are invited to contact the Editor-in-Chief prior to submission in order to screen the proposed topic for relevance and priority, given other review articles that may already be in preparation. Review articles should focus on recent scientific or clinical advances in an area of broad interest to those in the field of hematology. Such articles must be concise and critical and should include appropriate references to the literature. All Review Articles, including those solicited by the Editors, are rigorously peer reviewed before a final publication decision is made.

Review articles should not exceed 4,000 words in length; the abstract must not exceed 250 words; we recommend a limit of 100 references. We wish for Review Articles to be written by experts who are personally committed to writing the manuscript, and therefore limit authorship to a maximum of 3 authors. The use of tables and color figures to summarize critical points is encouraged; the Journal offers assistance with preparation or improvement of figures by professional illustrators, once the article is accepted.

Pharmaceutical or medical device company employees and medical writers supported by a pharmaceutical or medical device company are not permitted to have any role in writing Review, Perspective, How I Treat, Blood Spotlight, or Evidence-based Focused Review articles. The use of editing services for non-English speakers is permissible, but it must be disclosed. Please direct any questions regarding this policy to the Editor-in-Chief prior to submission.

 

Perspectives

Perspectives are articles discussing significant topics and controversies relevant to hematology, generally from a more personal or opinion-based standpoint than a Review Article. Interested authors should correspond with the Editor-in-Chief prior to submission to discuss the suitability of the proposed subject matter. The length of the article should not exceed 4,000 words; the abstract must not exceed 250 words; we recommend a limit of 100 references. We wish for Perspectives to be written by experts who are personally committed to writing the manuscript, and therefore limit authorship to a maximum of 3 authors. Typically, Perspectives should state the topic and background information concisely, discuss opposing viewpoints, and make recommendations for further investigations or actions.

Pharmaceutical or medical device company employees and medical writers supported by a pharmaceutical or medical device company are not permitted to have any role in writing Review, Perspective, How I Treat, Blood Spotlight, or Evidence-based Focused Review articles. The use of editing services for non-English speakers is permissible, but it must be disclosed. Please direct any questions regarding this policy to the Editor-in-Chief prior to submission.

 

Blood Spotlight

Blood Spotlights are articles that focus on emerging scientific and clinical developments or a recent burst of advances on a particular theme in a circumscript area and are generally solicited by the Editor-in-Chief; authors wishing to submit an unsolicited Blood Spotlight are invited to contact the Editor-in-Chief prior to submission to allow screening of the proposed topic for relevance and priority in relation to other Spotlight articles that may already be in preparation. Spotlights deal with scientific or clinical topics that typically have surfaced in the last 1-3 years and that fomented a significant interest in the field of hematology. Spotlights must offer critical discussions in a highly condensed and succinct format. They should include appropriate references to the literature. All Blood Spotlights, including those solicited by the Editors, are rigorously peer reviewed before a final publication decision is made.

Blood Spotlights should not exceed 1,500-2,000 words in length, should include an abstract of no more than 80 words, and we recommend a limit of 80 references. We wish for Blood Spotlight articles to be written by experts who are personally committed to writing the manuscript, and therefore limit authorship to a maximum of 3 authors. Article titles should be concise. The inclusion of no more than 2 tables and/or color figures to highlight and summarize critical points is encouraged; the Journal offers assistance with preparation or improvement of figures by professional illustrators, once the article is accepted.

Pharmaceutical or medical device company employees and medical writers supported by a pharmaceutical or medical device company are not permitted to have any role in writing Review, Perspective, How I Treat, Blood Spotlight, or Evidence-based Focused Review articles. The use of editing services for non-English speakers is permissible, but it must be disclosed. Please direct any questions regarding this policy to the Editor-in-Chief prior to submission.

 

How I Treat

The Journal welcomes articles written by expert clinicians offering up-to-date information and guidance regarding diagnosis and treatment of hematological diseases and clinical situations based on longstanding clinical experience.  Each How I Treat article focuses on a single disease for which new information has recently emerged. Because many hematologic diseases are rare, their clinical management cannot always be based on large clinical trials. This increases the value of having articles authored by leading experts with in depth experience in the chosen disease.

How I Treat articles need to allow the clinical reader to gain greater insight into the biology of the disease and how it shapes clinical decision making through the synthesis of an expert clinician. Furthermore, these articles provide directions in the therapeutic management of common or complex clinical situations of the disease. The How I Treat articles contain illustrative clinical cases which should enhance their practical usefulness among the readers. The exemplary clinical cases in the text focus on the daily reality of clinical practice and present the information in an easily digestible format. Thus, the clinical cases need to be functionally integrated into the text for a full understanding of the issues and offer a link to the scientific background and diagnostic and therapeutic considerations in a practically meaningful way.

For instance, a How I Treat article could comprise: I. Introduction; II. Two to six cases each highlighting distinct clinically relevant issues and/or management dilemmas which are linked to the discussion that is presented; and III. Conclusion. Alternatively, one or two cases are presented that set the stage and are referred throughout the discussion. Selected supporting figures and tables are recommended. For examples see eg AM Vannucchi, How I treat polycythemia vera, Blood 2014,124:3212-3220;  G. Ossenkoppele and B. Löwenberg, How I treat the older patient with acute myeloid leukemia, Blood, 2015,125: 767-774).

These pieces are generally solicited by the Editor-in-Chief, though any interested author should correspond with the Editor-in-Chief prior to submission to discuss the suitability of the proposed subject matter.  We wish for How I Treat articles to be written by experts who are personally committed to writing the manuscript, and therefore limit authorship to a maximum of 2 authors. The length should not exceed 4,000 words; the abstract must not exceed 200 words; we recommend a limit of 100 references.

Pharmaceutical or medical device company employees and medical writers supported by a pharmaceutical or medical device company are not permitted to have any role in writing Review, Perspective, How I Treat, Blood Spotlight, or Evidence-based Focused Review articles. The use of editing services for non-English speakers is permissible, but it must be disclosed. Please direct any questions regarding this policy to the Editor-in-Chief prior to submission.

Evidence-based Focused Reviews

Evidence-based Focused Review articles are designed to synthesize recent scientific or clinical advances of importance to hematology and related areas of investigation and are solicited by the Special Section Editor. Our goal for these reviews is to provide concise, critical, and insightful overviews of these emerging advances to our readership. Each article will be subject to external peer-review, and acceptance for publication depends on editorial oversight. Please see the link below to a previously published Evidence-Based Focused Review to see an example that exemplifies this type of paper - http://www.bloodjournal.org/content/118/24/6269.full.

Evidence-based Focused Reviews should be limited to 2000 words of text and we recommend a limit of 20 references. Abstracts are not required for this article type.  The use of color graphics that succinctly summarize major concepts is encouraged; 1 to 2 figures or tables are acceptable; and the journal offers assistance with preparation or improvement of figures by professional illustrators, once the article is accepted.

Authors are encouraged to include one senior content expert, one methodology expert, and up to 2 additional authors. Articles should be phrased starting with a clinical question; starting with a clinical case is encouraged. A literature review should be performed and summarized. Data (where available) should be systematically extracted. Summative statistics should be presented (where possible). Authors are encouraged to provide 1 or 2 treatment recommendations and quantify the strength of the recommendation using the GRADE system (Reference List  (1) Guyatt GH, Norris SL, Schulman S, Hirsh J, Eckman MH, Akl EA et al.  Methodology for the development of antithrombotic therapy and prevention of  thrombosis guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed:  American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines.  Chest 2012; 141(2 Suppl):53S-70S).

Pharmaceutical or medical device company employees and medical writers supported by a pharmaceutical or medical device company are not permitted to have any role in writing Review, Perspective, How I Treat, Blood Spotlight, or Evidence-based Focused Review articles. The use of editing services for non-English speakers is permissible, but it must be disclosed. Please direct any questions regarding this policy to the Editor-in-Chief prior to submission.

 

Blood Work

Blood welcomes submissions of photomicrographs and brief case descriptions to emphasize the value that the microscope adds to the history and physical exam. Blood Work places importance on the peripheral smear. The figure must clearly demonstrate the feature(s) being described and the discussion should emphasize this teaching point(s).   Blood Work is an educational instrument to physicians and hematology students. Studies or case studies will not be accepted. 

Accepted material will be added to the ASH Image Bank. Each submission must contain a single, high-resolution figure (may be a composite) formatted as a TIFF (minimum 300 dpi) and a discussion of no more than 200 words describing the clinical case linked to the image and summary teaching point. Each piece should have a maximum of two authors and should not contain references. All other policies governing submissions to the Journal apply to Blood Work. There will be no submission fee and no color figure charges for publication if accepted. For questions about submission to this section, please contact the Journal’s Editorial Office at editorial@hematology.org.

 

Blood Forum

Blood Forum is an article type that presents well-documented opinions, including controversial topics, and offers a sounding board for current subjects of importance to the science and practice of hematology. Examples of topics may include regulatory and health care issues or policies, as well as evolving scientific or medical developments in hematology. These papers are subject to full Editorial and peer review.

Maximum length for a Blood Forum article is 3,000 words of text - not including the tables, figure legends, and references. A Blood Forum must not have an abstract, but it should have a clear and concise introductory section. Submissions are limited to a total of 7 figures and tables, and digital images are required. We recommend a limit of 100 references.

Any involvement by pharmaceutical or medical device company employees or medical writers supported by a pharmaceutical or medical device company in the writing of this article must be disclosed to the Editor-in-Chief in the cover letter and must also be clearly defined and disclosed in the Authorship and/or Acknowledgements section(s) of the manuscript as appropriate. Please direct any questions regarding this policy to the Editor-in-Chief prior to submission.

Letters to Blood

The journal accepts original communications that bring out a focused but novel and important message on basic or clinical topics in hematology. All clinical submissions must have been approved by an ethics committee or institutional review board. Consideration for publication will be based on priority and interest to readership as determined by Editorial evaluation and peer review. In general, Letters to Blood report primary investigations that provide novel and important insights into hematologic biology or pathobiology, or the therapy of hematologic disease. Submissions are not intended to allow publication of incomplete or preliminary findings.

Single-case reports or small case series are considered in the Journal only if they offer truly important data elucidating disease biology or therapy.

Letters to Blood include no more than 1,200 words of text, 25 references, and 2 figures or tables. Letters have no abstract.  A clear title is required. Letters to Blood are posted to First Edition, indexed by Medline, and appear in PubMed. Submission fees and page charges do not apply to Letters.

The majority of brief, constructive comments on articles published in Blood should be formatted and submitted as e-Letters (see below for more information), unless they contain significant new primary data and/or the inclusion of figures to make important points. A Response from the author of an original article may be invited by Editors.

 

e-Letters

Short, relevant comments that would expand reader understanding of Blood articles published within the past 12 months can be submitted as e-Letters. These contributions undergo a rapid editorial review and are posted shortly after acceptance. e-Letters will remain accessible and linked to published articles on the Journal's Web site in perpetuity; they are not indexed by Medline. e-Letters must have no more than 10 authors and consist of no more than 300 words of text, 5 references, and 1 table or figure. The table or figure can be uploaded at submission as a doc, jpg, tiff or gif file. Any conflicts of interest (see Conflict of interest disclosure) will be posted with the submission. e-Letters are typically not edited, so careful attention to spelling and grammar is required.

e-Letters that are not directly related to a published article, that duplicate points similar to those of already posted comments, or that are characterized by profanity, personal attacks, unprofessional tone or content, or offensive, abusive or libelous language will not be posted. e-Letters can be referenced using the following format:

e.g., Smith JA. Response to Top 200 drugs by WAC for hospitals in 2001. [e-Letter], Blood (e-Letter’s Web address). February 18, 2010. Accessed May 27, 2010.

Authors of published articles are encouraged to respond with their own comments to e-Letters that have been posted in reference to their articles.

 

Inside Blood Commentaries

The Editors invite experts in the field to write brief commentaries introducing and placing into context selected primary research articles included in each issue of Blood.