Advertisement

FcγRIIIa-158V/F Polymorphism Influences the Binding of IgG by Natural Killer Cell FcγRIIIa, Independently of the FcγRIIIa-48L/R/H Phenotype

Harry R. Koene, Marion Kleijer, Johan Algra, Dirk Roos, Albert E.G.Kr. von dem Borne and Masja de Haas

Article Information

Citation 
vol. 90 no. 3 1109-1114
PubMed 

Print ISSN 
Online ISSN 
History 
  • Submitted January 29, 1997
  • Accepted March 19, 1997
  • Published online August 1, 1997.


Contributors 
  • Harry R. Koene, 1 From the Central Laboratory of the Netherlands Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service and Laboratory for Experimental and Clinical Immunology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam; and Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
  • Marion Kleijer, 1 From the Central Laboratory of the Netherlands Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service and Laboratory for Experimental and Clinical Immunology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam; and Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
  • Johan Algra, 1 From the Central Laboratory of the Netherlands Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service and Laboratory for Experimental and Clinical Immunology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam; and Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
  • Dirk Roos, 1 From the Central Laboratory of the Netherlands Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service and Laboratory for Experimental and Clinical Immunology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam; and Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
  • Albert E.G.Kr. von dem Borne, 1 From the Central Laboratory of the Netherlands Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service and Laboratory for Experimental and Clinical Immunology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam; and Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
  • Masja de Haas, 1 From the Central Laboratory of the Netherlands Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service and Laboratory for Experimental and Clinical Immunology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam; and Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Altmetric.com Statistics

The Altmetric score is a weighted count of online attention designed to reflect the volume and reach of online engagement surrounding an individual research output