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Deeper Molecular Response in Patients (pts) with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Chronic Phase (CML-CP) Patients Receiving Radotinib 300 Mg BID or Imatinib: Rerise 36 Months Follow-up

Young Rok Do, Hawk Kim, Jae-Yong Kwak, Jeong-A Kim, Hyeoung-Joon Kim, Joon Seong Park, Jooseop Chung, Ho-Jin Shin, Sung-Hyun Kim, Udomsak Bunworasate, Chul Won Choi, Narcisa Sonia Cornejo Comia, Dae Young Zang, Sukjoong Oh, Saengsuree Jootar, Ary Harryanto Reksodiputro, Won-Sik Lee, Yeung-Chul Mun, Jee Hyun Kong, Priscilla B. Caguioa, Jinny Park, Chul W. Jung and Dong-Wook Kim

Abstract

Background

In RERISE phase 3 study, radotinib demonstrated significantly higher and faster rates of major molecular response (MMR) than imatinib in patients with newly diagnosed CML-CP. By 12 and 24 months follow up, MMR (BCR-ABL1 IS≤ 0.1%) and MR4.5 (BCR-ABL1 IS ≤ 0.0032%) in radotinib 300 mg twice daily (bid) were higher than imatinib group. Also, early molecular response (EMR) at 3- or 6- months could predict better outcomes in both radotinib or imatinib groups. To confirm the long-term benefits and risks of radotinib 300mg bid and imatinib 400mg qd, we update the results from RERISE phase 3 study based on a minimum follow-up of 36 months.

Methods

241 patients were randomized 1:1:1 to radotinib 300 mg bid (n=79), radotinib 400 mg bid (n=81), or imatinib 400 mg once daily (qd) (n=81). Methods have been previously reported (Blood 2015 126:476). We evaluated MMR and MR4.5, overall survival (OS), and progression-free survival (PFS) by 36 months. Also, we analyzed the clinical impacts of early and deeper molecular response in radotinib 300mg bid and imatinib 400mg qd groups.

Results

By 36 months, MMR was significantly higher in patients receiving radotinib 300 mg bid compared with imatinib 400mg qd (Table). The MR4.5 rate by 36 months was also higher for radotinib compared to imatinib (43% vs 28%; P=0.0538). More patients treated with radotinib achieved additional MMR and MR4.5 since 12 months and time to MR4.5 was faster in radotinib than imatinib (median 924 vs 1,095 days; P=0.2534). Of 59 patients who had MMR by 36 months, 18 patients achieved MMR, and of 34 patients who had MR4.5 by 36 months, 22 patients achieved MR4.5 since 12 months. Estimated OS and PFS rate at 36 months were not significantly different in two groups (98% vs 97%; P=0.0554, 99% vs 95%; P=0.4707). Treatment failure was lower in radotinib group compared with imatinib group (Table).

The safety profiles were consistent with those previously reported and most of adverse events (AEs) have developed within 12 months. Since 12 months, newly developed AEs such as rash, nausea/vomiting, pruritis, musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, hyperbilirubinemia, and ALT elevation, etc have shown minimal increase by 36 months FU.

Conclusions

With a minimum 36 months follow-up, radotinib continued to demonstrate significantly higher rates of MMR and MR4.5 than imatinib in newly diagnosed CML-CP. Also, these responses with radotinib were earlier and deeper compared with imatinib. These results still demonstrate that radotinib can be one of the standards of care in newly diagnosed CML-CP and support the higher possibility of treatment- free remission (TFR) on frontline therapy with radotinib.

Disclosures Kim: Il-Yang: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; BMS: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; Takeda: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; Novartis: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; Pfizer: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding.

  • * Asterisk with author names denotes non-ASH members.