Blood Journal
Leading the way in experimental and clinical research in hematology

THE EXCRETION OF UROBILINOGEN IN THE STOOLS AND URINE DURING MALARIAL INFECTION

  1. A. DE VRIES, M.D. and
  2. F. Schiffer, Dipl. Ing.
  1. Medical Department, Division B, Rothschild Hadassah University Hospital, and from the Laboratory of Pathological Physiology, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Palestine. The work was carried out with the help of the Jacob Kerbel Scholarship Grant.

Abstract

In 10 cases of malaria (6 benign tertian, 4 malignant tertian), the excretion of urobilinogen in the stools and in the urine was studied. In all 10 cases the amount of urobilinogen excreted in the stools was found to be increased. After defervescence and disappearance of parasites from the blood the excretion gradually declined. The increased excretion of urobilinogen in the stools was the constant and sometimes the only evidence of increased blood destruction occurring at times in the complete absence of jaundice and reticulocytosis. Increased excretion of urobilinogen in the urine was not a constant feature.

It is suggested that the development of jaundice and of urobiligenuria is due not only to the liberation of pigments by the hemolysis, but to a disturbance in the liver function.

This study lends further confirmation to the concept that the only unequivocal evidence of increased blood destruction is shown in an increased output of urobilinogen in the feces.

The author is indebted to Dr. M. Rachmilewitz for his suggestions and criticisms.